Nvidia’s revenue jumps 46% thanks to $3.75 bn from Data Center biz

Nvidia said revenue rose 46 percent to $8.29 billion in Q1 2022 thanks to record revenue in Gaming and Data Center business.
Nvidia at trade show
Nvidia’s revenue from data center business surged 83 percent from a year ago and up 15 percent from the previous quarter to a record $3.75 billion.

Nvidia’s revenue from gaming business jumped 31 percent from a year ago and up 6 percent from the previous quarter to a record $3.62 billion.

Nvidia’s revenue from Professional Visualization business increased 67 percent from a year ago and down 3 percent from the previous quarter to $622 million.

Nvidia’s revenue from Automotive and Robotics business fell 10 percent from a year ago and rose 10 percent from the previous quarter to $138 million.

Nvidia said its expected revenue for the second quarter of fiscal 2023 will be $8.10 billion, plus or minus 2 percent. This includes an estimated reduction of approximately $500 million relating to Russia and the Covid lockdowns in China.

Jensen Huang, founder and CEO of NVIDIA, said: “The effectiveness of deep learning to automate intelligence is driving companies across industries to adopt NVIDIA for AI computing. Data Center has become our largest platform, even as Gaming achieved a record quarter.”

“We are gearing up for the largest wave of new products in our history with new GPU, CPU, DPU and robotics processors ramping in the second half. Our new chips and systems will greatly advance AI, graphics, Omniverse, self-driving cars and robotics, as well as the many industries these technologies impact.”

Gaming revenue’s year-on-year increase reflects higher sales of GeForce GPUs based on NVIDIA Ampere architecture, while sequential increase was driven by higher sales of GeForce GPUs for laptops and SOCs for game consoles.

Data Center revenue’s increases were primarily driven by sales of NVIDIA Ampere architecture GPUs and DGX systems used across both training and inference. Growth was led by cloud computing and hyperscale customers for workloads such as natural language processing and deep recommenders.

Professional Visualization revenue’s year-on-year increase was mainly driven by sales of NVIDIA Ampere architecture products, with growth in workstations as enterprises supported hybrid work environments. The sequential decrease was due to lower sales of desktop workstation GPUs, partially offset by higher sales of notebook workstations GPUs.

Automotive revenue’s year-on-year decrease was due to automakers’ supply constraints and the decline of legacy cockpit revenue, while the sequential increase was driven by AI cockpit revenue.